New Revenge Porn Law in Minnesota

On August 1, 2016 a new law will go into effect in the state of Minnesota that is designed to crack down on individuals who disseminate private sexual images or attempt to solicit sex for another person without consent. According to Minneapolis felony lawyer Max Keller, “The bill creates long overdue remedies to protect victims of revenge porn while more effectively defining the terms of the crime itself.”

In recent years, revenge porn has developed into a growing crime that has affected the lives of innocent victims throughout the United States. Advances in technology and the expansion of the internet have enabled perpetrators to easily spread sexual photos, videos and even solicitations for sexual encounters all over the world in just a matter of days. Under the new law, anyone who is convicted of revenge porn can face gross misdemeanor charges that could result in up to $3,000 in fines, one year behind bars, or both.

When aggravating factors are present, the crime can be upgraded to a felony, which could result in a convicted individual spending up to five years in prison and facing up to $10,000 in fines. Depending on the circumstances surrounding the crime, the courts may also award compensation to the victim for other damages that are linked to revenge porn. Since these charges can include court costs, reasonable attorney fees, financial losses and up to an additional $10,000 in civil penalties, the costs involved with a conviction can add up quickly.

While the new law is a positive step to protect the rights of revenge porn victims, it is important to remember that many of these cases involve innocent defendants who are in fact victims of angry revenge themselves. According to attorney Max Keller, “It is hoped that the clearer definitions that are provided in the bill will also protect defendants who are wrongfully accused.”

Max Keller has won countless jury trial cases involving misdemeanors and felonies, sex crimes, and DWI’s. He is a member of the Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice, which only allows the top 50 criminal defense attorneys in the state as members. Max is a frequent speaker at CLE’s and is often asked for advice by other defense attorneys across Minnesota.

Years of Experience: Approx. 20 years
Minnesota Registration Status: Active
Bar & Court Admissions: State of Minnesota Minnesota State Court Minnesota Federal Court 8th Circuit Federal Court of Appeals State of Maryland

What to Do If You Have Been Charged with a Criminal Offense

Confidential informants may provide integral information to help build criminal investigations, but how reliable is that information when they are receiving payment for their services? To protect them, state law requires the identity of informants be kept confidential. For those facing criminal charges, however, this creates challenges in questioning the accuracy and validity of the information given at trial.
Stay calm and compose after getting accused of a crime but not charged in Minneapolis, MN. Do not discuss the facts of your case with anyone, including your relatives and family members. Hire a criminal defense attorney with a demonstrated record of winning cases like yours. Your attorney will discuss your rights, guide you on how to cooperate with law enforcement within the legal boundaries, and build a solid defense strategy to fight the charges you could face in the future.
Expungement and sealing of records in Minnesota affect how your criminal history appears to government agencies and the public. The main difference between the two legal actions is that expungement permanently removes past arrests, criminal charges, or convictions from private and public databases, while sealing hides the criminal record from the public. Courts, government entities, and law enforcement agencies can access sealed criminal records.