Minnesota Fails People on Felony Probation, Sends Them To Prison

Minnesota is failing its prisoners released on Felony Probation.  We are  leading the Country in sending persons on Felony Probation back to Prison within 3 years.  That means we are failing big-time, and wasting a lot of money.  We should be turning these people recently released from prison into tax-paying citizens so that they can work and their payroll taxes will help pay for OUR Social Security and Medicare benefits when we retire.

The Dept. of Corrections, the prosecutors, and the prison guards union all have a lot to answer for here.  Keller Criminal Defense Attorneys and many others in and out of the Minnesota Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (MACDL) have worked hard lobbying at the Capitol in St. Paul for expungement reform.  One reasons felons are returning to prison while still on probation is that they can’t get any legitimate jobs. They often can’t find housing also because of a felony record, even if they have been off probation for 10 years or more.  A felony on their record makes them un-employable and prevents them from even obtaining housing!  People with felonies on their record deserve a *second chance* and a clean start, especially when they successfully completed probation years or even decades ago!.  And it benefits the rest of us if they can get a job and pay into the system instead of taking money FROM the system.

     IF YOU LIVE IN MINNESOTA, please contact your legislator now and ask him/her to pass the Expungement Reform bill that was passed by the Legislature last year, but vetoed by Governor Pawlenty.

Max Keller has won countless jury trial cases involving misdemeanors and felonies, sex crimes, and DWI’s. He is a member of the Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice, which only allows the top 50 criminal defense attorneys in the state as members. Max is a frequent speaker at CLE’s and is often asked for advice by other defense attorneys across Minnesota.

Years of Experience: Approx. 20 years
Minnesota Registration Status: Active
Bar & Court Admissions: State of Minnesota Minnesota State Court Minnesota Federal Court 8th Circuit Federal Court of Appeals State of Maryland

What to Do If You Have Been Charged with a Criminal Offense

Confidential informants may provide integral information to help build criminal investigations, but how reliable is that information when they are receiving payment for their services? To protect them, state law requires the identity of informants be kept confidential. For those facing criminal charges, however, this creates challenges in questioning the accuracy and validity of the information given at trial.
Stay calm and compose after getting accused of a crime but not charged in Minneapolis, MN. Do not discuss the facts of your case with anyone, including your relatives and family members. Hire a criminal defense attorney with a demonstrated record of winning cases like yours. Your attorney will discuss your rights, guide you on how to cooperate with law enforcement within the legal boundaries, and build a solid defense strategy to fight the charges you could face in the future.
Expungement and sealing of records in Minnesota affect how your criminal history appears to government agencies and the public. The main difference between the two legal actions is that expungement permanently removes past arrests, criminal charges, or convictions from private and public databases, while sealing hides the criminal record from the public. Courts, government entities, and law enforcement agencies can access sealed criminal records.